sysadmin

Installing, Configuring and Customizing Arch Linux

Arch Linux is a great distro that boasts bleeding edge up-to-date rolling releases as well as a very light and efficient base install. There is no graphical install and it expects you to have some basic Linux chops already just to perform the installation. Beginners shouldn't be scared away though because Arch Linux has a great wiki and awesome documentation.

Installing and Configuring FreeNAS 8.3.1

FreeNAS is a great option for home or enterprise level network attached storage(NAS.) It is based on FreeBSD so it benefits from many of the unique BSD tools like jails. Jails are a secure way of segmenting a process. The plugins available run in jails to help with security. Installing FreeNAS itself is as simple as following the prompts. I'm not going to cover the base installation because it is simple, but will focus more on the post-install configuration. Note that the drive you install FreeNAS to can't be shared over the network.

Create Script from Bash History

The script program (bsdutils) will output the whole terminal output to a file. This can be helpful for logging and creating scripts out of history.

The approach here is to output the command history to a file and then manipulate the file a bit to get what we want.

history 3 > script.sh

This will output the last 3 commands to script.sh. Note that the actual history command will become the most recent event in history, and will be output in the file. This can be edited out manually or using this command:

Bash Shortcut Keys

Sometimes when working we don't always have a fully featured keyboard. Whether using a small portable bluetooth keyboard, old software, or you just want to be a command line ninja, these shortcuts are very important to know to increase productivity and to work through technical limitations on keyboards.

Useful Linux Bash Shell Aliases

Typing long commands over and over gets old. Use bash aliases to make your life easier and impress your peers. Add these to your .bashrc and/or .bash_profile. Personally I use only one and symlink them together. These are just some examples of how you can use alias. Anytime you find yourself repeating lengthy commands think about creating an alias. Optionally, if it's a long command you are only going to be using for a short period, be sure to use history tools like ! and !? to quickly repeat previous commands.